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Michael Washington has put out a new module developers guide for DotNetNuke, he's got a link in his latest blog to the documentation page on DotNetNuke.com. Check it out, Michael has been hard at work on these two documents (parts 1 and 2) over the past few months, and they are great resources for getting familiar with DNN development. Posted from...
My good buddy Chad Hobson has created his first meaningful technical blog post to help the masses. He had some issues when upgrading to Asp.Net Ajax Beta 2 for his AutoCompleteExtender controls and took the time to create a helpful post on how to make those controls work. Be sure to drop Chad a comment on his blog as well, tell him how cool he is in that mean looking photo. Posted from...
 Since I've yet to have time daily to post a new DotNetNuke tip I'm renaming my feature to just be DotNetNuke tips! I'll continue to post them when I have the time to do so.While I was off meeting with a client DotNetNuke dropped a new release! Go out and get it!If you're running any of the recent releases 3.3.* or 4.3.* it's highly recommended you upgrade to 4.3.4, there were some security issues found and resolved with those releases.More DotNetNuke Tips next week. Posted from...
DotNetNuke Daily Tip for 7/19/2006 DotNetNuke comes with a lot of functionality out of the box that people don't even know exists. Once of those items that has been overlooked by many with the latest releases of DotNetNuke is the DNNMenu, part of the ClientAPI Framework that Jon Henning has worked on. The SolPartMenu is by far the most used menu for DotNetNuke, it's been part of DNN since the early days, and really can be quite powerful in its implementation. It's also been a big beef with a lot of skin designers as getting solpartmenu working just right can be a bit tricky, and torturous at times. I'm actually a fan of the SolPartMenu, but for today's tip I want to point you to a few resources on the DNNMenu. I recently, as in last night, implemented the DNNMenu for my wedding site I've been putting together the past few days, you can see it implemented at www.horsesandcars.com. The DNNMenu was created by Jon Henning, the same developer of the Original SolPartMenu. Here's a quote from Jon “A few people asked me, the author of the Solution Partners Hierarchical Menu Control, why I would develop a competing menu control to my own.  The answer is simple.  The SolpartMenu is old and carries a lot of baggage with its almost 4 years worth of backwards compatibility.  It has been a goal for v2 of the solpartmenu to abstract all of the common logic not specific to the menu into separate js files that could be reused by other controls and applications.  This is exactly what the ClientAPI is; an abstraction of logic like positioning, DOM access, XML, etc.  The script for the menu should contain only code for the menu, thus making it easier to maintain and enhance.  So in essence, the DNNMenu is in a lot of ways the solpartmenu v2.0.”  And some of the features for DNNMenuKeyboard NavigationThe menu can now receives focus as the user tabs through the controls on the page.  Once it has focus, you can use the arrow keys to navigate its structure.  Pressing enter will invoke the menu item's clickaction.  Populate On DemandThe DNNMenu will support POD in the same manner as the DNNTree control.  This provide a nice performance boost for those of you concerned with page sizes.  I even had time to make the module actions menu support POD.  See chart below for comparisons between each option and other menus. Mouse In DelayOne of the features of the Solpart menu that was continually asked for was a mouse-in delay.  This delay allows for people who are navigating to the sub-menus and accidentally move off the parent some grace period to get it right.  The DNNMenu defaults this value to a quarter of a second (.25).  I believe this is acceptable, however, for users used to the fast response times of other menus, it may look like the DNNMenu is a little sluggish.  Note:  At this time there is no way of configuring this property in the skin. No Hardcoded MarkupProbably the biggest regret I had in the original design of the Solpart menu was the hardcoding of certain tags in the code.  This included the NOWRAP attribute added to the menu items, the use of spacer.gif and   to obtain the correct spacing, and the worst of all, the hardcoding of the border around the menu items when hovering.  None of this hardcoding is present in the DNNMenu.  Note:  the one exception is the spacer.gif that is used to do the iframe trick.  I need a url to point the IFrame to in order to not get the security error when the site uses SSL. Option to Remove All Use of TablesThe menu supports a property that will completely remove its use of tables.  Hopefully this will appease those developers and skinners who think that tableless designs are the way to go.  I originally had the UseTables property default to False, but since it was too difficult to keep things lined up across browsers without adding some...
After a long haitus over the past few weeks the DotNetNuke Daily Tips are back! Sometimes you want to put a skinobject in your DotNetNuke Skins that you need to act like a module. Inheriting from PortalModuleBase instead of SkinObjectBase. SkinObjects though don't get loaded like regular modules and due to that you may run into issues where you can't easily access the TabId of the existing page. Here's how to get that information easily.Dim objPortalModule As PortalModuleBase = DotNetNuke.UI.Containers.Container.GetPortalModuleBase(Me)thisTabId = objPortalModule.TabIdPut the above code in your skinobject code and you will now have a PortalModuleBase object that you can use to easily access some of the basic DNN properties you're used to using from PortalModuleBase.The above is VB code, any self respecting C# developer should be able to figure out the appropriate C# code. If not, email me and I'll bill you at my hourly rate ;)Stay tuned for another DotNetNuke Daily Tip coming tomorrow! Posted from...
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Chris Hammond is a father, husband, leader, developer and car guy. Chris has long specialized in ASP.NET and DotNetNuke development, so you will find a variety of topics here on the website. For more information check out the about me page.

If you are looking for DotNetNuke consulting please visit my business website at https://www.christoc.com/