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I decided earlier this year that I was going to branch out from my DotNetNuke (DNN) roots and start working on other open source applications, this decision came over many discussions with folks at the 2018 DNNSummit. As soon as I got home from Denver, I got myself setup with a demo site running on Orchard, then I did absolutely nothing with it after that. Fast forward a few months and I had a new idea for a blog that I wanted to do, not wanting to go with my usual DNN + Engage Publish suite of tools, like every other blog I use, I decided that I would install Orchard CMS on Microsoft Azure.

After one false start (I installed Orchard CMS initially), I got Orchard Core up and running on Azure and a blog setup pretty easily. Once I did though, I decided that I needed to change the look of the default “The Blog Theme” that was included with Orchard Core, because I was working with the source code in Visual Studio it was fairly easy to track down where “The Blog Theme” was, it was a separate CSPROJ file in the Orchard Core solution. Rather than simply modifying that theme however, I decided I would clone the theme, rename it, keep the MIT License intact, and start my “own” theme for use within Orchard Core. To do that, I followed the following steps.

  1. In the Windows File Explorer, navigate to OrchardCore\src\OrchardCore.Themes
  2. Right click on TheBlogTheme, copy and paste
  3. Rename “TheBlogTheme Copy” to your new theme name, I chose CollectorOfJackTheme (after the website I am building)
  4. Navigate into your new theme folder, find “TheBlogTheme.csproj”, rename the project file to your new theme name “CollectorOfJackTheme.csproj”
  5. Open up the Orchard Core solution in Visual Studio 2017.
  6. Expand the solution explorer src/OrchardCore.Themes
  7. Right click on that OrchardCore.Themes folder and choose to Add Existing project, find your CollectorOfJackTheme.csproj file.
  8. Open up the Manifest.cs file and rename any of the properties you want to adjust.
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  9. Press Control-Shift-F in Visual Studio and do a “find” for “TheBlogTheme”, limit the scope of the find to Current Project to make your results easier to manage. Basically you want to find every instance of “TheBlogTheme” in your current project and replace it with the name of your new project.
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  10. After that, you can start making changes/adjustments/etc to your new project so that you can customize your theme.

Once you’ve created your new theme, and made any necessary changes, you’re going to want to try to deploy that theme. I had hoped it would be as simple as hitting Publish in Visual Studio to get the theme deployed out to my Azure instance and selectable, but this was not the case. In order to get things deployed and accessible, you need to make one final change.

  • In Visual Studio, in the solution, navigate to src/OrchardCore.Targets
  • Right click on OrchardCore.Application.Cms.Targets, and choose Add Reference.
  • From there choose your Project, click okay a few times
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  • Save
  • Compile
  • Publish

From there you should now have a NEW theme available to you under the Admin/Themes/Active Themes page. You can simply choose to Make Default, and apply the theme.
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Stay tuned for future blogs around my experiences using Orchard Core!

SpecFRS loaded up for travel

Wow, what a week! Last Wednesday I loaded up the SpecFRS onto a borrowed trailer and left St. Louis the following morning to drive to Lincoln Nebraska for spring Nationals, 4 days of racing. The drive out was uneventful, spent it trying to listen to old “The Forward” podcasts, I’m not a huge podcast guy, even though I used to have my own back in the day, but I’ve been trying to listen to Armstrong’s podcast from the beginning, long drives are about the only time I can actually listen to it.

The TireRack has announced that they have sold their 100th SSC kit! I have some insider knowledge that says they sold it before the Spring Nationals, but the announcement just came out today via the SoloMatters newsletter (hey look at that screenshot, who is that?)!

If you haven’t tried SSC out yet, you are missing out! This class is the future of Solo!

Speaking of Spring Nationals, stay tuned for our write up, we’re still trying to get caught up, but it should be up later this week!

On July 18th, 2018, ClubReady will be deprecating support for non-secure HTTP requests to the ClubReady Public API, found at https://www.clubready.com/api/current/ 
After this date you will no longer be able to make requests to ClubReady end points with the HTTP protocol.
All requests need to be modified before this date to utilize the HTTPS via TLS 1.2. Earlier versions of TLS (1.0, and 1.1) are no longer supported due to security vulnerabilities.

Live Test On June 27th

ClubReady will be testing this change in production, for 2 hours, starting at 1pm Central Time on Wednesday June 27th, 2018. This will allow us to implement the change, and log any requests that come in during that time so that we can identify requests that haven't been properly updated. If you haven't changed your calls by this date, any calls during this time frame will fail.

Does this impact me?

That question is best answered with another question, do you utilize the ClubReady API in any way? Typically this is done via a third party piece of software, an integration, that puts Leads from your website into your ClubReady application, or perhaps a Mobile app that uses the ClubReady for scheduling. If you haven't developed a custom tool to add leads into ClubReady, or a custom website to perform sales within ClubReady's API you likely don't have anything to worry about.

Why is ClubReady making this change?

To further enhance security of our systems, and your data, we are proactively making this change. 

What if I'm using a different API?

If you are using http://www.clubready.com/api this change will impact you just the same. We also recommend that you change your API path to be https://www.clubready.com/api/current/ for all future requests.

SSC Cars in Impound waiting for the Challenges

In short, WOW. What an amazing weekend.

I went into the weekend hopeful that I would drive the car well, and that I would be able to prove to myself that I can hang with the big dogs. I’ve been autocrossing for a long time (with a few gaps in between) and while I’ve had some spurts of random success outside of St. Louis, I have never felt confident that I could do it repeatedly. The idea of SSC, a Spec class in Solo, was very intriguing to me, as I wanted to try to rule out “I don’t have the right car”, from the equation.

The weekend started out with me leaving St. Louis just after 1pm due to a company all hands meeting. I ended up getting down to Arkansas Aeroplex in Blytheville just after 5pm on Friday evening. I parked the car and met up with my co-driver for the weekend, Kevin Dietz out of Washington state. We discussed if there was a chance to do practice starts, or take a shot at the practice course. The practice starts were wrapping up, so I quickly unloaded the car and headed over. We ended up taking 7 practice runs between the two of us, and found the car to be rather pushy.

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Chris Hammond is a father, husband, leader, developer and car guy. Chris has long specialized in ASP.NET and DotNetNuke development, so you will find a variety of topics here on the website. For more information check out the about me page.

If you are looking for DotNetNuke consulting please visit my business website at http://www.christoc.com/

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